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Golden Retriever Lifetime Study

Update v16-2

Golden Retriever Lifetime Study Update v16-2

A complete blood count is one part of the blood work included in your dog’s Golden Retriever Lifetime Study annual study examination and also if your dog gets sick. What does the CBC tell your veterinarian about your dog?>

Health Tip

As spring arrives, a few common-sense reminders will help your dog regain peak fitness with ease. Monitor your dog’s paw pads and start with several brief or low-intensity outings. Don’t impose “weekend warrior” syndrome on your dog. Maintain a balance of skill training (agility, obedience, tricks), fitness (walking, running, swimming), and activities that are just for fun. Almost any activity is better with the companionship of your dog. Be thoughtful about their exercise and physical fitness to help them stay happy, healthy and injury free.

Introducing Barbara Wolfe

DVM, PhD, DACZM

By Sharon Albright, DVM, CCRT, Study Veterinarian

Dr. Barb Wolfe joined Morris Animal Foundation as its chief scientific officer in January 2016. She brings inspirational leadership and innovative ideas to the foundation. Recently she shared her goals for Morris Animal Foundation and specifically the Golden Retriever Lifetime Study.>

Coming Soon:

appointment module

By Kelly Diehl, DVM, Scientific Writer and Researcher

The Golden Retriever Lifetime Study is excited to announce a new online appointment tracking section on your dog’s study page. This section is a read-only section for both owner and veterinary users. >

Understanding

a diagnosis of canine lymphoma

By Sharon Albright, DVM, CCRT, Study Veterinarian

Lymphoma is defined as the malignant proliferation of lymphoid cells – the cells that carry out the body’s immune function – primarily affecting lymph nodes or solid organs such as the liver and spleen.1 In dogs it usually presents in middle-aged to older individuals, involves multiple organs, and affects males and females equally. >

Health Tip

As spring arrives, a few common-sense reminders will help your dog regain peak fitness with ease. Monitor your dog’s paw pads and start with several brief or low-intensity outings. Don’t impose “weekend warrior” syndrome on your dog. Maintain a balance of skill training (agility, obedience, tricks), fitness (walking, running, swimming), and activities that are just for fun. Almost any activity is better with the companionship of your dog. Be thoughtful about their exercise and physical fitness to help them stay happy, healthy and injury free.

Thank you, John Rasmussen

Thanks to the fine work of John Rasmussen – cartoonist, golden volunteer and pet parent to Chief (Hero #2039), $21,000 was raised through sales of the 2016 3,000 Strong Calendar! All proceeds from the calendar were donated to Morris Animal Foundation’s Golden Retriever Lifetime Study. The calendars went on sale during the 3,000 Strong Celebration in September 2015. An exhausted John signed all 1,000 calendars that weekend.

Are interested in supporting the study’s current fundraiser? Get more information.

Meet Hero #2002

Because every dog matters — in case you missed it, meet Hero Dog #2002.

And the lucky winner is Hunny!

In February, the Golden Retriever Lifetime Study team announced a new incentive for our participants. Each year, dogs that have completed study requirements are automatically entered in a drawing to receive a valuable prize. Say congratulations to Hunny, #905, from Akron, Penn.! >