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Golden Retriever Lifetime Study

Update v16-3

Golden Retriever Lifetime Study Update v16-3

The blood chemistry panel includes a number of tests a diagnostic laboratory runs on the non-cellular component of blood (serum) your veterinarian collects from your dog. These tests impart important information about organ function in your dog, providing clues to the cause of illness when he or she is sick, and helping to prevent future problems when he or she is well. >

Health Tip

About 16% of dogs in the Golden Retriever Lifetime study go on extended trips (greater than two weeks). What should you do if your study dog has a veterinary emergency while away from home?
Prior to your trip, look up veterinarians in the area where you’ll be vacationing. If illness or injury are an unfortunate addition to your vacation, the last thing you’ll want to be doing is scrambling to find an open clinic. If you have a veterinary emergency or illness, take your dog to the veterinarian of your choice. When the dust has settled, contact the study team to coordinate any reporting or special testing that needs to be done for the study, such as an Additional Veterinary Visit report or biopsy.

Find more information on our website under: Resources.

Introducing Michael Betley

DVM, pathology resident

By Sharon Albright, DVM, CCRT, Study Veterinarian

The Golden Retriever Lifetime Study team is pleased to welcome Dr. Michael Betley as the first recipient of the Pathology Residency Training Grant to support the Morris Animal Foundation Golden Retriever Lifetime Study. Dr. Betley, a PhD candidate in neuroscience at Stanford University, will begin working this summer at Colorado State University to support our study. Recently, he shared his thoughts about his goals and the Golden Retriever Lifetime Study.>

Coming Soon:

user improvements to laboratory reports

By Kelly Diehl, DVM, Scientific Writer and Researcher

The Golden Retriever Lifetime Study is excited to announce updates to the online laboratory results section of the study website. Veterinarians can now view, download and even electronically share results with their clients. Laboratory results for all study patients appear on the respective patient’s online record in a more user-friendly table format.>

Understanding

hemangiosarcoma

By Sharon Albright, DVM, CCRT, Study Veterinarian

Hemangiosarcoma is a cancer dreaded by all golden retriever owners and veterinarians. The adage, “between a rock and hard place,” applies to most cases of this disease as it forces the owner to make a difficult, potentially life-saving decision within minutes of the diagnosis. It is important to be aware of and ready for this cancer, so you can be the best advocate for your dog if ever needed.>

Health Tip

About 16% of dogs in the Golden Retriever Lifetime study go on extended trips (greater than two weeks). What should you do if your study dog has a veterinary emergency while away from home?
Prior to your trip, look up veterinarians in the area where you’ll be vacationing. If illness or injury are an unfortunate addition to your vacation, the last thing you’ll want to be doing is scrambling to find an open clinic. If you have a veterinary emergency or illness, take your dog to the veterinarian of your choice. When the dust has settled, contact the study team to coordinate any reporting or special testing that needs to be done for the study, such as an Additional Veterinary Visit report or biopsy.

Find more information on our website under: Resources.

T-shirt sales & Virtual walk

One of the highest compliments to a nonprofit organization is when volunteers help support the mission through self-driven fundraising.

The Golden Retriever Lifetime Study’s volunteer supporter group is an incredibly engaged group of study participants (and their golden retrievers) and supporters living in every part of the United States. They are committed to supporting the science that will unlock answers in the fight against cancer and other diseases, and have a grassroots network of support for Morris Animal Foundation’s Golden Retriever Lifetime Study.

During the past few months, a T-shirt/hoodie campaign designed by Volunteer of the Year, Candace Verduce, and organized by the volunteer leadership team, has brought in more than $20,000 for the study.

The effort was perfectly timed for many participants to proudly display their new golden fashionwear during events across the nation to support the Morris Animal Foundation Unite to Fight Pet Cancer Virtual Walk. It comes as no surprise that the Golden Retriever Lifetime Study’s “3000 Strong Team” exceeded expectations and their $10,000 goal — raising $18,836.

If you missed one of these giving opportunities, you can make a donation directly to the study today.

Meet Hero #2357

Because every dog matters — in case you missed it, meet Hero Dog #2357.

Fear Free – the next breakthrough in veterinary medicine

The next advancement in veterinary medicine will be the consideration of a pet’s emotional well-being in addition to their physical health. That is the goal of the new Fear Free initiative, managed by the American Animal Hospital Association. The Fear Free Certification Program aims to educate the veterinary profession on methods to reduce fear, stress, and anxiety in pets and their owners allowing for better veterinary care. >