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Golden Retriever Lifetime Study

Update v16-4

Golden Retriever Lifetime Study Update v16-4

In previous newsletters, we discussed the interpretation of complete blood counts and blood chemistry. The final component of routine clinical pathology is urinalysis. Kidneys can be thought of as factories responsible for: a) removing waste products and drugs from the body; b) balancing body fluids; and c) performing other essential metabolic functions. Where do the products from all this hard work go? The urine, of course! For this reason, examination of urine samples gives us essential information about the work kidneys are doing and how well they are doing it. >

Health Tip

Avoid a hazardous Halloween
When it comes to our dogs, Halloween can be especially frightening. Chocolate is toxic and, at certain levels, can be deadly to dogs. Grapes and raisins (found in some candy) can cause kidney failure. Pumpkin seeds, corn on the cob, and candy wrappers can irritate and obstruct a dog’s digestive system. Treats that contain the sugar substitute xylitol (such as chewing gum and even some peanut butters) can cause low blood sugar, seizures, liver failure and death. Keep Halloween treats safely out of reach to prevent a scary emergency visit to the veterinarian.

Introducing John Reddington

DVM, PhD

By Kelly Diehl, DVM, Scientific Writer and Researcher

The Golden Retriever Lifetime Study team is pleased to welcome Dr. John Reddington as Morris Animal Foundation’s new President and CEO.>

Understanding:

Canine Osteosarcoma

By Sharon Albright, DVM, CCRT, Study Veterinarian

Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor of dogs, with 10,000 new diagnoses each year. It is most commonly diagnosed in large and giant dog breeds. >

Coming Soon:

Personal fundraising pages

By Kelly Diehl, DVM, Scientific Writer and Researcher

We know you are committed to Morris Animal Foundation’s Golden Retriever Lifetime Study. But did you ever wish you could involve more people? >

Health Tip

Avoid a hazardous Halloween
When it comes to our dogs, Halloween can be especially frightening. Chocolate is toxic and, at certain levels, can be deadly to dogs. Grapes and raisins (found in some candy) can cause kidney failure. Pumpkin seeds, corn on the cob, and candy wrappers can irritate and obstruct a dog’s digestive system. Treats that contain the sugar substitute xylitol (such as chewing gum and even some peanut butters) can cause low blood sugar, seizures, liver failure and death. Keep Halloween treats safely out of reach to prevent a scary emergency visit to the veterinarian.

Necropsy – what you need to know to be prepared

By Dr. Sharon M. Albright, Study Veterinarian

Eventually, we all will be impacted by the death of one or more of our study dogs. Planning ahead can decrease the stress involved with end-of-life decisions for your pet, particularly on the question of whether or not you should request a necropsy (similar to an autopsy in humans).

This study is gathering valuable data from each of our study dogs during their lives, but at the time of death, there is even more we can learn. To help gather this additional information, and make it as easy as possible for owners and veterinarians, we soon will be distributing Golden Retriever Lifetime Study necropsy kits to those owners who have consented to a necropsy on their study profile.

Owners will receive one packet per dog with full instructions, labels and shipping supplies for samples collected during a necropsy. Since emergencies happen, this kit should remain with each dog’s caregiver so that it can be provided to any veterinarian who may perform the necropsy – your regular study veterinarian, a specialist, emergency clinic veterinarian, or a local pathologist. Make sure your necropsy consent form is up to date on your dog’s study webpage, and remember that your preferences can be changed at any time.

While no one wants to think about their beloved dog’s end of life, please discuss necropsy options with your study veterinarian now, so that your wishes are carried out when the time comes. And we hope that won’t be for a very long time.

 

Meet Hero #2450

Because every dog matters — in case you missed it, meet Hero Dog #2450.

Fundraising Highlight: A golden community

A sense of community is a concept golden retriever owners understand very well. This past quarter, a number of celebratory events brought people and dogs together to strengthen past relationships, introduce new friends, and raise funds for Morris Animal Foundation’s Golden Retriever Lifetime Study. Three events in particular were grand successes. >